Converse All Stars Vote

The 2020 election will be here before you know it. Converse has teamed up with
Rock the Vote and When We All Vote to make sure you’re prepared on Election Day
no matter which method you choose to cast your ballot. All your questions for mail-in
voting, early in-person voting, and making a plan for Election Day are answered below.

 

Voting this year can’t wait. THE TIME IS NOW.

Polling Places Near You

Polling Places Near You

Heading out to the polls in person?
Make sure you’re going to the right place.

Ballot Tool

Ballot Tool

Know what’s on your ballot
before you head to the polls.

Get Your Friends to Vote

Get Your Friends to Vote

Make your pledge to vote in the 2020 Election,
and then ask 3 friends to do the same.

Converse All Stars Vote

The 2020 election will be here before you know it. We answer all your questions around being prepared below. Voting this year can’t wait.
The time is now.

Polling Places
Near You

Heading out to the polls in person? Make sure you’re going to the right place.

Ballot Tool

Know what's on your ballot
before you head to the polls.

Get Your Friends To Vote

Make your pledge to vote in the 2020 Election, and then ask 3 friends to do the same.

The Facts

 

Don't be a voter statistic. Make your voice heard.
Click on each fact to open, save, and share to your social media.

Here are two easy ways to participate and ensure your voice is heard. Register to vote if you’re a first-time voter or check your registration status.

Here are two easy ways to participate and ensure your voice is heard.
Register to vote if you’re a first-time voter or check your registration status.

Make your plan to vote-by-mail now. Find your state and request your ballot today. This way you’ll have enough time to fill it out and return it early.

Make your plan to vote-by-mail now. Find your state and
request your ballot today. This way you’ll have enough
time to fill it out and return it early.

For our election to represent the diversity of our country, you must make your voice heard.

For our election to represent the diversity of our country,
you must make your voice heard.

The Facts

Don’t be a voter statistic. Make your voice heard. Click on each fact to open, save, and share to your social media.

Make Your
Voice Heard.

Here are two easy ways to participate and ensure your voice is heard. Register to vote if you’re a first-time voter or check your registration status.

Vote Safely.

Make your plan to vote-by-mail now. Find your state and request your ballot today. This way you’ll have enough time to fill it out and return it early.

Represent Diversity.

For our election to represent the diversity of our country, you must make your voice heard.

Voting FAQs

Whether this is your first time voting, or your first time requesting a mail-in ballot,
the voting process can be confusing. Check out this list of frequently asked questions
and links to our partner sites to make sure you’re prepared on Election Day.
 

REGISTRATION AND REGISTRATION STATUS

I may already be registered but I don't know. How do I know if I'm registered to vote?

I may already be registered but I don't know.
How do I know if I'm registered to vote?

 

You can check your voter registration status directly with your state or by using our voter registration lookup tool.

Can I put a PO Box address or a school mailbox address as my permanent address?

Can I put a PO Box address or a school mailbox address as my permanent address?

 

No. Your form will not be processed if you put a PO Box as your permanent address. For districting purposes, you must put a physical address. There is a section of the form to put your mailing address, in addition to your physical address.

I am in the armed forces. How do I register to vote?

I am in the armed forces.
How do I register to vote?

 

You can register to vote and request a ballot through Rock the Vote’s partnership with the Overseas Vote Foundation. You can also contact the Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVSP). They specialize in getting people in the armed forces and people living abroad registered to vote. The rules for people in the armed forces or abroad are different than for people living in the United States. The FVAP can also be reached by phone at (800) 438-VOTE.

I am a student. Can I register to vote at my school address?

I am a student. Can I register to vote at my school address?

 

YES! You have the right to register to vote at your school address—this includes a dorm room. Any student living in a dorm is entitled to the same rights as a student living off-campus. If you receive mail in a Post Office box you can sign an affidavit (or, in some cases, get a letter from your college’s Residential Life office) asserting that you live at your dorm address.

I am a voter with a disability. Will my polling place be accessible and what options do I have to cast a ballot?

I am a voter with a disability. Will my polling place be accessible and what options do I have to cast a ballot?

 

Every voter has the right to cast a private and independent ballot, including voters with disabilities. If you want to learn more about what your voting rights are or were denied the right to vote because of your disability, you can contact your state’s National Disability Rights Network member agency.

I was previously convicted of a felony. Can I register to vote?

I was previously convicted of a felony. Can I register to vote?

 

If you were convicted of a felony, your voting rights may vary from state to state.

Do I need to re-register if I've moved?

Do I need to re-register if I've moved?

 

Yes, if you have changed your address, changed your name, or need to change your political party, you must re-register.

Do I need to be a U.S. citizen to register to vote?

Do I need to be a U.S. citizen to register to vote?

 

Yes. You must be a naturally born or fully naturalized U.S. citizen to register to vote.

Do I need to be 18 to register to vote?

Do I need to be 18 to register to vote?

 

The voter registration age requirement varies by state, but most states allow individuals who will be 18 by the next General Election to register to vote. Some states do have a minimum age requirement to register to vote (for example you may have to be 17 1⁄2 years of age). You must be at least 18 years old to cast your ballot in the General Election.

 
 
 
 

VOTING BY MAIL AND ON ELECTION DAY

What is a Voter ID and does my state require an ID to vote?

What is a Voter ID and does my state require an ID to vote?

 

Your state may require an ID to vote. The most commonly accepted form of voter ID is a current state-issued driver's license or non-driver's ID card. If you do not have a driver’s license or non-driver’s ID card, your state may have acceptable alternative forms of ID.

I think my rights have been violated when I voted early or on Election Day. What should I do?

I think my rights have been violated when I voted early or on Election Day. What should I do?

 

Call the Election Protection hotline at (866) OUR-VOTE if you feel your rights have been violated. There will be lawyers on hand to answer questions and concerns about voting procedures before and on Election Day.

What if I go to the polls and I’m informed that my name is not on the list of registered voters?

What if I go to the polls and I’m informed that my name is not on the list of registered voters?

 

First, make sure you are at the right polling place. If you are at the wrong polling place they will not have your name on the list of voters. If you are at the correct location and are not on the list, you can still cast a ballot by asking the poll worker for a provisional ballot. After the polls close on Election Day, the state will check on the status of your voter registration and if there was a mistake made. The state must notify you as to whether your ballot was counted. If you have a problem voting and think your rights have been denied, call (866) OUR-VOTE. There will be lawyers there to help.

How do I request a ballot to vote by mail?

How do I request a ballot to vote by mail?

 

You’ll need to request it directly from your local Election office.
Find State by State Options

 

You can also learn more about your vote-by-mail options.
Learn More About Vote-by-Mail

How can I get my friends and family to register and vote?

How can I get my friends and family to register and vote?

 

Every vote in every town, city, county, and state matter. Voting is the most powerful way to have your voice heard.
 
Use this Vote Tripling tool to encourage as many friends and family as possible to get involved in this year’s election or tell them to get registered.
Use Vote Tripling Tool

 

Tell your friends to get registered to vote below.
Get Registered

Voting FAQs

The voting process can be confusing. Check out this list of frequently asked questions and links to our partners to make sure you’re prepared on Election Day.

Registration and Registration Status

I may already be registered but I don't know. How do I know if I'm registered to vote?

You can check your voter registration status directly with your state or by using our voter registration lookup tool.

Can I put a PO Box address or a school mailbox address as my permanent address?

No. Your form will not be processed if you put a PO Box as your permanent address. For districting purposes, you must put a physical address. There is a section of the form to put your mailing address, in addition to your physical address.

I am in the armed forces. How do I register to vote?

You can register to vote and request a ballot through Rock the Vote’s partnership with the Overseas Vote Foundation. You can also contact the Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVSP). They specialize in getting people in the armed forces and people living abroad registered to vote. The rules for people in the armed forces or abroad are different than for people living in the United States. The FVAP can also be reached by phone at (800) 438-VOTE.

I am a student. Can I register to vote at my school address?

YES! You have the right to register to vote at your school address—this includes a dorm room. Any student living in a dorm is entitled to the same rights as a student living off-campus. If you receive mail in a Post Office box you can sign an affidavit (or, in some cases, get a letter from your college’s Residential Life office) asserting that you live at your dorm address.

I am a voter with a disability. Will my polling place be accessible and what options do I have to cast a ballot?

Every voter has the right to cast a private and independent ballot, including voters with disabilities. If you want to learn more about what your voting rights are or were denied the right to vote because of your disability, you can contact your state’s National Disability Rights Network member agency.

I was previously convicted of a felony. Can I register to vote?

If you were convicted of a felony, your voting rights may vary from state to state.

Do I need to re-register if I've moved?

Yes, if you have changed your address, changed your name, or need to change your political party, you must re-register.

Do I need to be a U.S. citizen to register to vote?

Yes. You must be a naturally born or fully naturalized U.S. citizen to register to vote.

Do I need to be 18 to register to vote?

The voter registration age requirement varies by state, but most states allow individuals who will be 18 by the next election to register to vote. Some states do have a minimum age requirement to register to vote (for example you may have to be 17 1⁄2 years of age). You must be at least 18 years old to cast your ballot in the General Election.

Voting by Mail and On Election Day

What is a Voter ID and does my state require an ID to vote?

Your state may require an ID to vote. The most commonly accepted form of voter ID is a current state-issued driver's license or non-driver's ID card. If you do not have a driver’s license or non-driver’s ID card, your state may have acceptable alternative forms of ID.

I think my rights have been violated when I voted early or on Election Day, what should I do?

Call the Election Protection hotline at (866) OUR-VOTE if you feel your rights have been violated. There will be lawyers on hand to answer questions and concerns about voting procedures before and on Election Day.

What if I go to the polls and I’m informed that my name is not on the list of registered voters?

First, make sure you are at the right polling place. If you are at the wrong polling place they will not have your name on the list of voters. If you are at the correct location and are not on the list, you can still cast a ballot by asking the poll worker for a provisional ballot. After the polls close on Election Day, the state will check on the status of your voter registration and if there was a mistake made. The state must notify you as to whether your ballot was counted. If you have a problem voting and think your rights have been denied, call (866) OUR-VOTE. There will be lawyers there to help.

How do I request a ballot to vote by mail?

You’ll need to request it directly from your local Election office.

 
You can also learn more about your vote-by-mail options.

How can I get my friends and family to register and vote?

Every vote in every town, city, county, and state matter. Voting is the most powerful way to have your voice heard.

 
Use this Vote Tripling tool to encourage as many friends and family as possible to get involved in this year’s election or tell them to get registered.

 
Tell your friends to get registered to vote below.